Articles | Volume 4, issue 2
Geosci. Commun., 4, 303–327, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-4-303-2021
Geosci. Commun., 4, 303–327, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-4-303-2021

Research article 11 Jun 2021

Research article | 11 Jun 2021

Fracking bad language – hydraulic fracturing and earthquake risks

Jennifer J. Roberts et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (further review by editor) (12 Jan 2021) by Beth Bartel
AR by Jen Roberts on behalf of the Authors (08 Feb 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (further review by editor) (10 Mar 2021) by Beth Bartel
AR by Jen Roberts on behalf of the Authors (20 Mar 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (23 Apr 2021) by Beth Bartel
ED: Publish as is (23 Apr 2021) by Iain Stewart(Executive Editor)
AR by Jen Roberts on behalf of the Authors (26 Apr 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
The potential for hydraulic fracturing (fracking) to induce seismicity is a topic of widespread interest. We find that terms used to describe induced seismicity are poorly defined and ambiguous and do not translate into everyday language. Such bad language has led to challenges in understanding, perceiving, and communicating risks around seismicity and fracking. Our findings and recommendations are relevant to other geoenergy topics that are potentially associated with induced seismicity.
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