Articles | Volume 3, issue 2
Geosci. Commun., 3, 365–379, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-3-365-2020

Special issue: Five years of Earth sciences and art at the EGU (2015–2019)

Geosci. Commun., 3, 365–379, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-3-365-2020

Research article 25 Nov 2020

Research article | 25 Nov 2020

Developing the hertz art–science project to allow inaudible sounds of the Earth and cosmos to be experienced

Graeme J. Marlton and Juliet Robson

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (11 Jul 2020) by Antonio Menghini
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (20 Jul 2020) by Antonio Menghini
AR by Graeme Marlton on behalf of the Authors (01 Sep 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (08 Sep 2020) by Antonio Menghini
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (17 Sep 2020) by Sam Illingworth(Executive Editor)
ED: Publish as is (18 Sep 2020) by Sam Illingworth(Executive Editor)
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Short summary
Hertz is an art–science installation allowing the public to experience the hidden vibrations of our planet through infrasound. Infrasound is sound below the human range of hearing produced by geological and atmospheric motion. Real-time recordings of infrasound were played through adapted furniture, which shook to allow the Earth’s inaudible symphony to be experienced. Hertz was exhibited to 7000 participants, of which 85 % felt reconnected to the environment after participating.
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