Articles | Volume 2, issue 2
Geosci. Commun., 2, 117–124, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2-117-2019
Geosci. Commun., 2, 117–124, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2-117-2019
Research article
 | Highlight paper
13 Aug 2019
Research article  | Highlight paper | 13 Aug 2019

Taking a Breath of the Wild: are geoscientists more effective than non-geoscientists in determining whether video game world landscapes are realistic?

Rolf Hut et al.

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Cited articles

Albers, C. J. and Hut, R.: Taking a Breath of the Wild, analyses code and data, https://doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/53VDS, 2019. a, b, c
Allen, L., Scott, J., Brand, A., Hlava, M., and Altman, M.: Publishing: Credit Where Credit Is Due, Nature News, 508, 312, https://doi.org/10.1038/508312a, 2014. a
Breuer, J. and Bente, G.: Why so serious? On the relation of serious games and learning, Journal for Computer Game Culture, 4, 7–24, 2010. a
Côté, I. M. and Darling, E. S.: Scientists on Twitter: Preaching to the choir or singing from the rooftops?, Facets, 3, 682–694, 2018. a
Curtis, V.: Public Engagement Through the Development of Science-Based Computer Games: The Wellcome Trust's “Gamify Your PhD” Initiative, Sci. Commun., 36, 379–387, https://doi.org/10.1177/1075547013492436, 2014. a
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Game worlds in modern computer games, while they include very Earth-like landscapes, are ultimately fake. Since games can be used for learning, we wondered if people pick up wrong information from games. Using a survey we tested if people with a background in geoscience are better than people without such a background at distinguishing if game landscapes are realistic. We found that geoscientists are significantly better at this, but the difference is small and overall everyone is good at it.
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