Articles | Volume 2, issue 2
Geosci. Commun., 2, 117–124, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2-117-2019
Geosci. Commun., 2, 117–124, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2-117-2019
Research article
 | Highlight paper
13 Aug 2019
Research article  | Highlight paper | 13 Aug 2019

Taking a Breath of the Wild: are geoscientists more effective than non-geoscientists in determining whether video game world landscapes are realistic?

Rolf Hut et al.

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Latest update: 27 Nov 2022
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Short summary
Game worlds in modern computer games, while they include very Earth-like landscapes, are ultimately fake. Since games can be used for learning, we wondered if people pick up wrong information from games. Using a survey we tested if people with a background in geoscience are better than people without such a background at distinguishing if game landscapes are realistic. We found that geoscientists are significantly better at this, but the difference is small and overall everyone is good at it.
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