Articles | Volume 2, issue 1
Geosci. Commun., 2, 95–100, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2-95-2019
Geosci. Commun., 2, 95–100, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2-95-2019

Research article 29 May 2019

Research article | 29 May 2019

Telling the boiling frog what he needs to know: why climate change risks should be plotted as probability over time

Simon Sharpe

Viewed

Total article views: 4,854 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
3,939 845 70 4,854 78 77
  • HTML: 3,939
  • PDF: 845
  • XML: 70
  • Total: 4,854
  • BibTeX: 78
  • EndNote: 77
Views and downloads (calculated since 18 Jan 2019)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 18 Jan 2019)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 3,967 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 3,935 with geography defined and 32 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Latest update: 18 Jan 2022
Download
Short summary
Humanity's situation with respect to climate change is sometimes likened to that of a frog in a slow-boiling pot of water. But are we telling the frog what he needs to know? Most climate science is communicated to governments in the form of predictions of what is most likely to happen. I argue it should instead answer the following questions: what is the worst that could happen, and how likely will that become as time goes by? The risks and need to act will then become much clearer to see.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint