Articles | Volume 2, issue 2
Geosci. Commun., 2, 101–116, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2-101-2019
Geosci. Commun., 2, 101–116, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2-101-2019

Research article 19 Jul 2019

Research article | 19 Jul 2019

The Met Office Weather Game: investigating how different methods for presenting probabilistic weather forecasts influence decision-making

Elisabeth M. Stephens et al.

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Latest update: 05 Dec 2021
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Short summary
The UK Met Office ran an online game to highlight the best methods of communicating uncertainty in their online forecasts and to widen engagement in probabilistic weather forecasting. The game used a randomized design to test different methods of presenting uncertainty and to enable participants to experience being lucky or unlucky when the most likely scenario did not occur. Over 8000 people played the game; we found players made better decisions when provided with forecast uncertainty.
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