Articles | Volume 3, issue 2
Geosci. Commun., 3, 291–302, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-3-291-2020
Geosci. Commun., 3, 291–302, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-3-291-2020

Research article 23 Sep 2020

Research article | 23 Sep 2020

The human side of geoscientists: comparing geoscientists' and non-geoscientists' cognitive and affective responses to geology

Anthea Lacchia et al.

Related authors

La Commedia Scientifica – Dante and the scientific virtues
Anthea R. Lacchia and Stephen Webster
Geosci. Commun., 4, 129–145, https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-4-129-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-4-129-2021, 2021
Short summary

Related subject area

Subject: Geoscience engagement | Keyword: Science engagement and dialogue
Demonstrating change from a drop-in space soundscape exhibit by using graffiti walls both before and after
Martin O. Archer, Natt Day, and Sarah Barnes
Geosci. Commun., 4, 57–67, https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-4-57-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-4-57-2021, 2021
Short summary
In my remembered country: what poetry tells us about the changing perceptions of volcanoes between the nineteenth and twenty-first centuries
Arianna Soldati and Sam Illingworth
Geosci. Commun., 3, 73–87, https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-3-73-2020,https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-3-73-2020, 2020
Short summary
“This bookmark gauges the depths of the human”: how poetry can help to personalise climate change
Sam Illingworth
Geosci. Commun., 3, 35–47, https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-3-35-2020,https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-3-35-2020, 2020
Short summary
Flash Flood!: a SeriousGeoGames activity combining science festivals, video games, and virtual reality with research data for communicating flood risk and geomorphology
Chris Skinner
Geosci. Commun., 3, 1–17, https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-3-1-2020,https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-3-1-2020, 2020
Short summary
An innovative STEM outreach model (OH-Kids) to foster the next generation of geoscientists, engineers, and technologists
Adrián Pedrozo-Acuña, Roberto J. Favero Jr., Alejandra Amaro-Loza, Roberta K. Mocva-Kurek, Juan A. Sánchez-Peralta, Jorge A. Magos-Hernández, and Jorge Blanco-Figueroa
Geosci. Commun., 2, 187–199, https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2-187-2019,https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2-187-2019, 2019
Short summary

Cited articles

Barthel, R. and Seidl, R.: Interdisciplinary Collaboration between Natural and Social Sciences – Status and Trends Exemplified in Groundwater Research, PLoS ONE, 12, e0170754, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0170754, 2017. 
Barthes, R.: Mythologies, Lowe and Brydone, Norfolk, 1974. 
Bickerstaff, K., Simmons, P., and Pidgeon, N.: Public perceptions of risk, science and governance: main findings of a qualitative study of six risk cases, Technical Report 06-03, Centre for Environmental Risk, Norwich, 2006. 
Bostrom, A., Morgan, M. G., Fischhoff, B., and Read, D.: What do people know about global climate change? 1. Mental Models, Risk Anal., 14, 959–970, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1539-6924.1994.tb00065.x., 1994. 
Boudet, H., Clarke, C., Bugden, D., Maibach, E., Roser-Renouf, C., and Leiserowitz, A.: “Fracking” controversy and communication: Using national survey data to understand public perceptions of hydraulic fracturing, Energ. Policy, 65, 57–67, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enpol.2013.10.017, 2014. 
Download
Short summary
Geoscientists can struggle to communicate with non-geoscientists, especially around contentious geoscience issues. We compare the thoughts and feelings of geoscientists and non-geoscientists around the subsurface, mining/quarrying, drilling and flooding. We find that geoscientists focus more on human interactions when thinking about these processes, while non-geoscientists focus more on economic and environmental impacts. Understanding these differences and similarities can help enable dialogue.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint