Articles | Volume 3, issue 1
Geosci. Commun., 3, 129–146, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-3-129-2020
Geosci. Commun., 3, 129–146, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-3-129-2020

Research article 15 May 2020

Research article | 15 May 2020

Rapid collaborative knowledge building via Twitter after significant geohazard events

Robin Lacassin et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (further review by editor) (02 Mar 2020) by Mathew Stiller-Reeve
AR by Robin Lacassin on behalf of the Authors (06 Mar 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (further review by editor) (28 Mar 2020) by Mathew Stiller-Reeve
AR by Robin Lacassin on behalf of the Authors (30 Mar 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (01 Apr 2020) by Mathew Stiller-Reeve
ED: Publish as is (01 Apr 2020) by Iain Stewart(Executive Editor)
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Short summary
Among social media platforms, Twitter is valued by scholars to disseminate scientific information. Using two 2018 geohazard events as examples, we show that collaborative open data sharing and discussion on Twitter promote very rapid building of knowledge. This breaks down the traditional ivory tower of academia, making science accessible to nonacademics who can follow the discussion. It also presents the opportunity for a new type of scientific approach within global virtual teams.
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