Articles | Volume 1, issue 1
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-1-9-2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-1-9-2018
Research article
 | 
10 Oct 2018
Research article |  | 10 Oct 2018

Representing the majority and not the minority: the importance of the individual in communicating climate change

Sam Illingworth, Alice Bell, Stuart Capstick, Adam Corner, Piers Forster, Rosie Leigh, Maria Loroño Leturiondo, Catherine Muller, Harriett Richardson, and Emily Shuckburgh

Viewed

Total article views: 4,834 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
3,631 1,090 113 4,834 109 124
  • HTML: 3,631
  • PDF: 1,090
  • XML: 113
  • Total: 4,834
  • BibTeX: 109
  • EndNote: 124
Views and downloads (calculated since 18 May 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 18 May 2018)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 4,834 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 4,364 with geography defined and 470 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Discussed (final revised paper)

Discussed (final revised paper)

Latest update: 15 Apr 2024
Download
Short summary
Climate change is real, it is happening now, and it will not be stopped by the sole efforts of scientists. This study shows how poetry and open conversation can be used to develop a dialogue around mitigating climate change with different communities, including faith groups and people living with disabilities. Furthermore, it shows how this dialogue can help us to better understand the opportunities that these communities present in tackling the negative effects of human-made climate change.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint