Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2022-8
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2022-8
 
11 Apr 2022
11 Apr 2022
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal GC.

Storming the news media: 5 years of reporting weather hazards and climate change

Chloe Brimicombe Chloe Brimicombe
  • Department of Geography and Environmental Science, University of Reading, Reading, RG6 6AB, UK

Abstract. Global heating has increased the risk of weather hazards in recent years. Communication of weather hazard risk by the news media has importance. Newsworthiness affects weather hazards reporting. Here, the methods used to adhere to the open science principles of reproducibility and transparency. Methods used are advanced Google searches of media articles and the emergency disaster database (EM-DAT) that consider the weather hazards floods, heat waves, wildfires, storms and droughts. Storms have had a large number of articles in the last five years. But, wildfires have a large number of articles per individual occurrence. Science and media collaborations could address the bias and improve reporting.

Chloe Brimicombe

Status: open (until 26 Jun 2022)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on gc-2022-8', Anonymous Referee #1, 09 May 2022 reply
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Chloe Brimicombe, 13 May 2022 reply

Chloe Brimicombe

Chloe Brimicombe

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Short summary
Climate change is increasing the risk of weather hazards (i.e. Storms and Heatwaves). Using open science methods it is shown that there is a bias in weather hazard reporting. Storms have had a large number of articles in the last five years. But, wildfires have a large number of articles per individual occurrence. Science and media collaborations could address the bias and improve reporting.
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