Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2021-6
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2021-6

  08 Apr 2021

08 Apr 2021

Review status: a revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal GC.

Teaching with digital geology in the high Arctic: opportunities and challenges

Kim Senger1, Peter Betlem1,2, Sten-Andreas Grundvåg3, Rafael Kenji Horota4, Simon John Buckley5, Aleksandra Smyrak-Sikora1, Malte Michel Jochmann1, Thomas Birchall1, Julian Janocha3, Kei Ogata6, Lilith Kuckero1, Rakul Maria Johannessen7,1, Isabelle Lecomte8, Sara Mollie Cohen1, and Snorre Olaussen1 Kim Senger et al.
  • 1Department of Arctic Geology, The University Centre in Svalbard, Longyearbyen, Norway 
  • 2Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway 
  • 3Department of Geosciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway 
  • 4Department of Applied Computing, UNISINOS ‐ Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos, Brazil
  • 5NORCE Norwegian Research Centre, P.O.B 22 Nygårdstangen, NO‐5838 Bergen 
  • 6Department of Earth Sciences, Environment and Resources, University of Naples “Federico II”, Italy 
  • 7Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, 1250 Copenhagen, Denmark
  • 8Department of Earth Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway 

Abstract. The Covid-19 pandemic occurred at a time of major revolution in the geosciences – the era of digital geology. Digital outcrop models (DOMs) acquired from consumer drones, processed using user-friendly photogrammetric software and shared with the wider audience through online platforms are a cornerstone of this digital geological revolution. Integration of DOMs with other geoscientific data, such as geological maps, satellite imagery, terrain models, geophysical data and field observations strengthens their application in both research and education. Teaching geology with digital tools advances students’ learning experience by providing access to spectacular outcrops, enhancing visualization of 3D geological structures and improving data integration. Similarly, active use of DOMs to integrate new field observations will facilitate more effective fieldwork and quantitative research. From a student’s perspective, geo-referenced and scaled DOMs allow an improved appreciation of scale and of 3D architecture, a major threshold concept in geoscientific education.

In view of the Covid-19 pandemic, DOMs allow to bring geoscientists to the outcrops digitally. At the University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS), located at 78° N in Longyearbyen in Arctic Norway, DOMs are actively used even in non-pandemic years, as the summer field season is short and not overlapping with the Bachelor “Arctic Geology” course package held from January to June each year. In 2017, we at UNIS developed a new course (‘AG222: Integrated Geological Methods: from outcrop to geomodel’) to encourage the use of emerging techniques like DOMs and data integration to solve authentic geoscientific challenges. In parallel, we have established the open access Svalbox geoscientific portal, which forms the backbone of the AG222 course activities and provides easy access to a growing number of DOMs, 360° imagery, subsurface data and published geoscientific data from Svalbard. Considering the rapid onset of the Covid-19 pandemic, the Svalbox portal and the pre-Covid work on digital techniques in AG222 allowed us to rapidly adapt and fulfill at least some of the students’ learning objectives during the pandemic. In this contribution, we provide an overview of the course development and share experiences from running the AG222 course and the Svalbox platform, both before and during the Covid-19 pandemic. 

Kim Senger et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Sizing Opportunities - give a handle, please.', Martin Bohle, 13 Apr 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Kim Senger, 22 Jul 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on gc-2021-6', Rachel Bosch, 25 May 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Kim Senger, 22 Jul 2021

Kim Senger et al.

Kim Senger et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 339 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
235 88 16 339 8 7
  • HTML: 235
  • PDF: 88
  • XML: 16
  • Total: 339
  • BibTeX: 8
  • EndNote: 7
Views and downloads (calculated since 08 Apr 2021)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 08 Apr 2021)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 308 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 308 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 31 Jul 2021
Download
Short summary
At UNIS, located at 78° N in Longyearbyen in Arctic Norway, we use digital outcrop models (DOMs) actively in a new course (‘AG222: Integrated Geological Methods: from outcrop to geomodel’) to solve authentic geoscientific challenges. DOMs are shared through the open access Svalbox geoscientific portal, along with 360° imagery, subsurface data and published geoscientific data from Svalbard. Here we share experiences from the AG222 course and Svalbox, both before and during the Covid-19 pandemic.
Altmetrics