Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2024-6
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2024-6
16 May 2024
 | 16 May 2024
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal GC.

Jupyter Book as an open online teaching environment in the geosciences: Lessons learned from Geo-SfM and Geo-UAV

Peter Betlem, Nil Rodes, Sara Mollie Cohen, and Marie Vander Kloet

Abstract. Together with our students, we co-created two open-access geoscientific course modules using the Jupyter Book environment that formed part of one undergraduate-level and one open-ended (undergraduate – professor) geology course that comprised both field and classroom teaching. The modules covered the acquisition of drone data and subsequent processing of 3D models and were iteratively revised over a four-year period. Each module implemented an in-line collection of videos, animations, code snippets, slides, and interactive material to complement the main text as a diverse open learning environment. Behind the scenes, Github was used to facilitate content version, co-creation and open publishing of the resources. We found that students were favourable to the framework and especially valued the framework’s accessibility, inclusivity, co-creation capabilities, and interactivity. Collaboration certainly helped cultivate an interest in revising the source materials and updating information where it was deemed outdated or unclear, regardless of the contributor’s background, affiliation or level of experience. However, effective co-creation relied on students to be able to use the tools at their disposal, plus be given the opportunity to contribute in their own ways. Through our combined efforts, we succeeded in providing lasting, up-to-date and open course materials to a campus with a small department that does not have significant experience nor capacity in developing and maintaining open educational resources. Work remains to establish optimal playtime durations for integrated animations and videos, as well as the translation of the modules into different languages. Finally, our efforts are an important step in the development of open educational geoscientific content co-created with input from technical experts, social scientists, and students alike.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Peter Betlem, Nil Rodes, Sara Mollie Cohen, and Marie Vander Kloet

Status: open (until 11 Jul 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on gc-2024-6', Enze Chen, 25 May 2024 reply
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Peter Betlem, 08 Jun 2024 reply
      • RC2: 'Reply on AC1', Enze Chen, 08 Jun 2024 reply
Peter Betlem, Nil Rodes, Sara Mollie Cohen, and Marie Vander Kloet

Data sets

Geo-SfM: Teaching Geoscientific Structure-from-Motion Photogrammetry Processing P. Betlem and N. Rodes https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.11173239

Geo-UAV: Teaching Geoscientific Drone-Based Data Acquisition N. Rodes, P. Betlem, and S. M. Cohen https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.11173399

Geo-MOD: Teaching Geoscientific Photogrammetry-Based Data Acquisition and Processing P. Betlem, N. Rodes, and S. M. Cohen https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.11172855

Peter Betlem, Nil Rodes, Sara Mollie Cohen, and Marie Vander Kloet

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Short summary
Together with our students, we co-created two open geoscientific course modules using the Jupyter Book framework. Students were happy with the framework's accessibility, inclusivity, interactivity, and multimedia content and eagerly contributed to the learning materials through Github when given the opportunity. Our efforts are an important step in the development of open educational geoscientific content co-created with input from technical experts, social scientists, and students alike.
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