Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2022-7
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2022-7
 
09 Mar 2022
09 Mar 2022
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal GC.

Climate Stories: Enabling and sustaining arts interventions in climate science communication

Ewan Woodley1, Stewart Barr1, Peter Stott2,3, Pierrette Thomet4, Sally Flint5, Fiona Lovell4, Evelyn O'Malley6, Dan Plews4, Chris Rapley7, Celia Robbins1, Rebecca Pearce1, and Rebecca Sandover1 Ewan Woodley et al.
  • 1Geography, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, UK
  • 2Mathematics, College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, United Kingdom
  • 3Hadley Centre, Met Office, Exeter, United Kingdom
  • 4Independent artist
  • 5English, College of Humanities, University of Exeter, United Kingdom
  • 6Drama, College of Humanities, University of Exeter, United Kingdom
  • 7Earth Sciences, University College London, United Kingdom

Abstract. The climate science community faces a major challenge for communicating the risks associated with climate change within a heavily politicised landscape, characterised by varying degrees of denial, scepticism, distrust in scientific enterprise and an increased prevalence of misinformation (“fake news”). This issue is particularly significant given the reliance on conventional ‘deficit’ communication approaches, which are based on the assumption that scientific information provision will necessarily lead to desired behavioural changes. Indeed, we argue that the constrained orthodoxy of scientific practices in seeking to maintain strict objectivity and political separation imposes very tangible limits on the potential effectiveness of climate scientists for communicating risk in many contemporary settings. To address these challenges, this paper uses insights from a collaboration between UK climate scientists and artist researchers to advocate for a more creative and emotionally attentive approach to climate science engagement and advocacy. In so doing, the paper highlights innovative ways in which climate change communication can be re-imagined through different art forms to enable complex concepts to become knowable, accessible and engaging to wider publics. We demonstrate that in learning to express their work through forms of art, including print-making, theatre and performance, song-writing and creative writing, researchers experienced not only a sense of liberation from the rigid communicative framework operating in their familiar scientific environment, but also a growing self-confidence in their ability and willingness to engage in new ways of expressing their work. As such, we argue that scientific institutions and funding bodies should recognise the potential value of climate scientists engaging in advocacy through art-science collaborations and that these personal investments and contributions to science engagement by individuals should be rewarded and valued alongside conventional scientific outputs.

Ewan Woodley et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on gc-2022-7', Tiziana Lanza, 31 Mar 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Ewan Woodley, 31 May 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on gc-2022-7', Frances Fahy, 15 Apr 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Ewan Woodley, 31 May 2022

Ewan Woodley et al.

Ewan Woodley et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 403 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
300 85 18 403 8 8
  • HTML: 300
  • PDF: 85
  • XML: 18
  • Total: 403
  • BibTeX: 8
  • EndNote: 8
Views and downloads (calculated since 09 Mar 2022)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 09 Mar 2022)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 363 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 363 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 07 Aug 2022
Download
Short summary
This paper reports on research insights from a collaboration between UK climate scientists and artist researchers to advocate for a more creative and emotionally attentive approach to climate science engagement and advocacy. The paper highlights innovative ways in which climate change communication can be re-imagined through different art forms to enable complex concepts to become knowable, accessible and engaging to wider publics.
Altmetrics