Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2020-50
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2020-50

  26 Jan 2021

26 Jan 2021

Review status: a revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal GC and is expected to appear here in due course.

Marine Meteorological forecasts for Coastal Ocean Users – Perceptions, Usability and Uptake

Christo Rautenbach1,2,3 and Berill Blair4 Christo Rautenbach and Berill Blair
  • 1Coastal and Estuarine Processes, National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), Hamilton, New Zealand
  • 2Institute for Coastal and Marine Research, Nelson Mandela University, South Africa
  • 3Department of Oceanography and Marine Research Institute, University of Cape Town, South Africa
  • 4Environmental Policy Group, Wageningen University and Research, Wageningen, The Netherlands

Abstract. The present study aims to address a proposed disconnect between science and the public. In this case, marine meteorological (metocean) information and the users of these data. Here, the focus is not only on the perceptions, usability and uptake of extreme event forecasts but rather focused on general, everyday situations. The research was conducted by means of a survey, designed around four research questions. Each question was then populated with propositions that were the guideline for the questionnaire. The research questions covered topics ranging from forecasting tool ergonomics, accuracy and consistency, usability, institutional reputation and uncertainties related to Climate Change (to name but a few). The survey was conducted in two southern hemisphere countries, South Africa and New Zealand. The online questionnaire was widely distributed to include both recreational and commercial users. Cultural Consensus Analysis (CCA) was used to investigate knowledge-based agreements within the total group of respondents as well as sectoral and community subgroups. The existence of subgroups within the communities (e.g. recreational and commercial) was also established. The general shared knowledge results are discussed together with user group demographic statistics. A comprehensive summery of all four research questions, with all the resulting propositions are also provide. The percentage of each subgroup’s agreement with the knowledge-based score (CCA model derived) is also provided with the beforementioned. Finally, a conceptual diagram is proposed to highlight the important interplay between forecast product co-development and scientific accuracy/consistency.

Christo Rautenbach and Berill Blair

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on gc-2020-50', Anders Doksæter Sivle, 04 Mar 2021
    • CC1: 'Reply on RC1', Christo Rautenbach, 18 Mar 2021
    • RC3: 'Reply on RC1', Anonymous Referee #2, 27 May 2021

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on gc-2020-50', Anders Doksæter Sivle, 04 Mar 2021
    • CC1: 'Reply on RC1', Christo Rautenbach, 18 Mar 2021
    • RC3: 'Reply on RC1', Anonymous Referee #2, 27 May 2021

Christo Rautenbach and Berill Blair

Christo Rautenbach and Berill Blair

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Short summary
The study aims to address a proposed disconnect between science and the public. In this case, marine meteorological information and the users of these data. Here, the focus is not only on the perceptions, usability and uptake of extreme event forecasts but rather focused on general, everyday situations. A survey was conducted in two southern hemisphere countries, South Africa and New Zealand and subgroups within the communities (recreational and commercial users) were identified and elucidated.
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