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Geoscience Communication An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2020-5
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2020-5
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 27 Apr 2020

Submitted as: research article | 27 Apr 2020

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This preprint is currently under review for the journal GC.

Science, Poetry, and Music for Landscapes of the Marche Region, Italy. Teaching the Conservation of Natural Heritage

Olivia Nesci1 and Laura Valentini2 Olivia Nesci and Laura Valentini
  • 1Department of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Urbino Carlo Bo, Urbino (PU), 61029, Italy
  • 2Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino Carlo Bo, Urbino (PU), 61029, Italy

Abstract. We present a new approach in science communication that uses artistic works to entice people to learn about landscapes. To this aim, we use narratives about a place in plain language accompanied by visual stimulations, poetry, and ancient music. The multidisciplinary approach resulting from the encounter and interplay among the different communicative methods arouse an emotional and intellectual experience that enables a personal connection to the place. This work is part of a larger multidisciplinary project covering 20 sites in the Marche Region (Central Italy) that includes scientific information on geological-geomorphological genesis, trekking itineraries, poetry, ancient music, video and cultural offerings. The project is documented through live multidisciplinary performances, the publication of project materials in a book with a DVD attached, and through a web site with the same contents. Among the many amazing landscapes of the Marche Region, we focus here on three sites from the north, the centre and the south of the region: The sea-cliff of San Bartolo, The flatiron of Mount Petrano and The fault of Mount Vettore, chosen as examples for their different processes of genesis and evolution. Our goal is to promote a deeper understanding of landscapes by integrating their origin and physical aesthetic with their cultural and artistic heritage. In doing so, we intend to educate people to have a new perception of geo-sites, starting from its physical beauty, building on scientific study and cultural history, and arriving to the knowledge of its social importance.

Olivia Nesci and Laura Valentini

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Olivia Nesci and Laura Valentini

Olivia Nesci and Laura Valentini

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Latest update: 07 Jul 2020
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Short summary
We present a new approach in science communication that uses art forms, such as poetry and ancient music, to entice people to learn about landscapes. Our goal is to promote a deeper understanding of landscapes by integrating their origin and physical aesthetic with their cultural and artistic heritage. We aim to educate people to a new perception of site, starting from its physical beauty, building on scientific study and cultural history, and arriving to the knowledge of its social importance.
We present a new approach in science communication that uses art forms, such as poetry and...
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