Journal cover Journal topic
Geoscience Communication An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2020-20
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2020-20
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  15 Jun 2020

15 Jun 2020

Review status
A revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal GC and is expected to appear here in due course.

Remember rhythm and rime: Memory and narratives in science communication

Aquiles Negrete Aquiles Negrete
  • Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM-CEIICH)

Abstract. Narratives include several characteristics that make them memorable, understandable and enjoyable. To study how memorable different ways are of presenting information is a fundamental task for science communication in order to evaluate materials that not only need to be understood by the general public, but also retained in the long-term as a part of the knowledge appropriation process. In this work I discussed that narratives can be seen as mnemonic structures that superimpose an artificial, logical structure on data which is not necessarily related. In this way scientific factual information can be communicated by being embedded in a mnemonic structure (the story) which facilitates future recollection. Narratives can also be seen as secondary modelling systems in which information is represented and organised by means of a plot. This enables us to make sense of reality and prepare information in an organised structure ready for future recall. Narratives offer information that is contextualised in real-life situations (episodes). When an episode in a narrative work evokes emotion in the reader, this incident may become memorable. Narratives also enable higher memory spans because the information included in them is grouped and organised in a semantic mode. Organisation and semantic links are, in turn, important factors for paired recall association, which represents an important aid in retrieving information from memory by association. Story schemas consist of abstract, content-free knowledge about the structure of a typical story. For science communication, one of the advantages of story schemas is that the lay public is already familiar with them; they represent a widespread and well-established knowledge that can be used, without previous instruction. The use of story schemas could enhance the communication process by facilitating several different stages in memory process. In this work I suggests that narratives represent an interesting tool for science communication to convey science not only in an attractive and reliable format, but also in a long lasting way.

Aquiles Negrete

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Aquiles Negrete

Aquiles Negrete

Viewed

Total article views: 329 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
195 91 43 329 42 39
  • HTML: 195
  • PDF: 91
  • XML: 43
  • Total: 329
  • BibTeX: 42
  • EndNote: 39
Views and downloads (calculated since 15 Jun 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 15 Jun 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 287 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 287 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 26 Nov 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Narratives include several characteristics that make them memorable, understandable and enjoyable. To study how memorable different ways are of presenting information is a fundamental task for science communication in order to evaluate materials that not only need to be understood by the general public, but also retained in the long-term as a part of the knowledge appropriation process.
Narratives include several characteristics that make them memorable, understandable and...
Citation
Altmetrics